Saturday, December 31, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 155: SONG #185

Day 155: A song that reminds you of someone

Back in those times when I was studying Catholic Theology, there were some friends of mine who did like U2. Some of them specifically liked the idea, that this was a catholic band, so Rock Music and religion seemed to go together. I do not like U2 too much, as I can't stand the priestly attitude of Bono combined with U2's megalomanic stardom. But I do like some of their early songs, and one among those I find really beautiful, New Year's Day. This also fits the time of the year and it reminds us of the Polish Solidarność Movement.


Friday, December 30, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 154: SONG #184

Day 154: Another song by Európa Kiadó

Today's song should match the category "Song that makes me sad"; as there have been so many sad songs on that blog lately, here is a song the mood of which is not to be called "sad" in my opinion, but it is also clearly not a "hippy-yippie-happy"-song. As I want to practice my Hungarian a bit (not to loose all of it and to be "fluent" when I am going to Szegedi Tudományegyetem to give a course on West-African Religions once more in February), I chose another song by my fav Hungarian band and tried to translate the lyrics once again. The song is in "visszafogott hangulat", which I found hard to translate. I ended up with "low-keyed mood" after consulting the Akadémiai Kiadó Dictionaries: Hungarian to German and English to Hungarian (I got one for the purpose of making myself understood when teaching in English in Hungary) and some German-English dictionaries. This is a live version of Nem Banja. Although the voice of Menyhárt Jenő does not easily and smoothly get all the notes (maybe he should stop "singing" songs like "Mocskos Idők" in the shouting style...), this is a fine rendering of a fine tune, all in all:




Halk zene, visszafogott hangulat
Az órámra nézek, épp éjfélt mutat
Itt ülök egy bárban, ő itt ül velem szembe
Olyan vonzó, és olyan idegen
Ragyog és sugárzik, finom és magabiztos
A szépsége titkos, de beavat, ahogy rám nevet
Nem tudom, ki ő, és mit mondjak neki
A szavak néha semmit nem jelentenek
De ha ő nem bánja, én nem bánom
És lenn az utcán megvárom

Ugyanaz a csillag, ugyanaz a bolygó
Ugyanaz a város és ugyanaz a bár
Az éjszaka előtte és nincs mit vesztene
Ö éppen itt, és engem éppen itt talált
Ragyog és sugárzik, finom és magabiztos
A szépsége titkos, de beavat, ahogy rám nevet
Nem tudom, ki ő, és mit mondjak neki
A szavak néha semmit nem jelentenek
De ha ő nem bánja, én nem bánom
És lenn az utcán megvárom


Quiet music, low-keyed mood
I look at my watch, it shows midnight
Here I sit in a bar, face to face with her*
So attractive and so foreign to me
She* shines and gleams, fine and self-conscious
Her* beauty is a secret she* lets me in on when she smiles
I don’t know who she* is and what to say to her*
Sometimes the words don’t have no meaning
But if she* does not regret, I do not regret
And keep waiting down in the street

It is the same star and the same planet
It is the same town and the same bar
The night before her and nothing she could loose
She is here right now and she has found me here
She shines and gleams, fine and self-conscious
Her beauty is a secret she lets me in on when she smiles
I don’t know who she is and what to say to her
Sometimes the words don’t have no meaning
But if she does not regret, I do not regret
And keep waiting down in the street

* as there is no grammatical gender in Hungarian, it could also mean: his, he a.s.o.

Thursday, December 29, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 153: SONG #183

Day 153: A song that makes me happy

This is the best Hungarian punk song of all times (hitherto), Mocskos Idök from the 80ies, the anthem of the legendary Európa Kiadó. Once again, if you do not feel immediately motivated to jump around like a rubber ball gone wild when listening to this song, you are dead. I remember giving a class at Szeged University and playing this song from my laptop during the break - and there were some officials of the university exchange programne that made my lecture possible in the audience, and the students asked me, whether I understood the words of the song. As my knowledge of Hungarian is rather limited (this beautiful language does not love me as much as I love HER), I am not sure, whether I got the lyrics right - there are some differing renderings to be found on the internet, I tried to find out what the singer actually sings on the live version from 2004 featured here. And I am pretty sure that I did not catch the last line. I also tried to translate it, hopefully my English version it is at least near to the Hungarian original.



Helló, bébi, te nyomorult állat,
Soha nem akartam különbet nálad,
Elállom az utat és megszerezlek,
Hihetetlen, hogy nem szeretlek,
Nem szeretlek, nem szeretlek,
De hogyha eltűnsz, megkereslek,
Bébi, bébi, te nyomorult állat,
Soha nem akartam különbet nálad,
Mocskos idők, szeretned kéne,
A jövő itt van, és sose lesz vége,
Mocskos idők, a sarokba bújva,
Bárhogy is volt kezdjük újra!
Helló, bébi, én azt hiszem, baj van,
Szúrj belém egy utolsót, halkan!
Ugrálni akarok, vadul ugrálni,
A nyomorult mennyeket akarom látni!
Népszerűtlen szerelem,
Sokan vagyunk kevesen,
Bébi, bébi, újra nálad,
Már nem ember, még nem állat.
Mocskos idők, szeretned kéne,
A jövő itt van, és sose lesz vége,
Mocskos idők, a sarokba bújva,
Hello bébi, kezdjük újra!
Egy hely örökzöld álmaimban,
Egy hely a titkos életemben,
A nővéred öreg, a húgod meg gyerek,
Hát ezért van, hogy hozzád megyek,
De ha úgy akarja a szervezetem,
Soha többé nem vagy senki nekem,
Bébi, bébi, elmegyek hozzád,
Ugyanaz a város, de mégse ugyanaz az ország.
Mocskos idők, szeretnem kéne,
A jövő itt van, és sose lesz vége,
Mocskos idők, a sarokba bújva,
A jövő itt van, kezdjük újra!

Hello baby you miserable animal / I never wanted something better than you / I leave the street and win you / Unbelievable that I don’t love you / Don’t love you, don’t love you / But when you disappear, I search for you / Baby, baby, you miserable animal / I never wanted something better than you / Dirty times, you should like it / The future is here, and it will not end / Dirty times, hiding in the corner / However it was, let’s start anew / Hello baby, I think there’s a problem / Stab me one last time, silently / I want to jump, to jump around wildly / I want to see the miserable heavens / Unpopular love / Often we are but a few / Baby, baby, again with you / No more human and not yet an animal / Dirty times, you should like it / The future is here, and it will not end / Dirty times, hiding in the corner / Hello Baby, let’s start anew! / A place in my evergreen dreams / A place in my secret life / Your big sister is old, the younger one still a child / This is why I come to you / But when my organism wants it / You are never nobody to me / Baby, Baby, I come to you / It is the same town, but not the same state / Dirty times, you should like it / The future is here, and it will not end / Dirty times, hiding in the corner / The future is here, let’s start anew!

1000 SONGS - DAY 152: SONG #182

Day 152: A Song that takes you to the Heart of Darkness


Rudi Spitzer, a Hungarian Jew who came to be known as Rezső Seress, composed the song "Szomorú Vasárnap" (lit: Sad Sunday) to the words of László Jávor in 1933. It became a world famous song and a jazz standard in the English version, to the words of Sam M. Lewis as "Gloomy Sunday". Many people have done recordings of that song, amongst them Billie Holiday. There is an urban legend, that the song has inspired hundreds of people to commit suicide. The one person connected to the song that actually has committed suicide is the composer himself. Here is his rendering of the song in the original Hungarian version (with lyrics):



Szomorú vasárnap
száz fehér virággal
vártalak kedvesem
templomi imával.
Álmokat kergető
vasárnap délelőtt,
bánatom hintaja
nélküled visszajött.
Azóta szomorú
mindig a vasárnap,
könny csak az italom,
kenyerem a bánat.
Szomorú vasárnap.
Utolsó vasárnap
kedvesem gyere el,
pap is lesz, koporsó,
ravatal, gyászlepel.
Akkor is miránk vár,
virág és – koporsó.
Virágos fák alatt
utam az utolsó.
Nyitva lesz szemem, hogy
még egyszer lássalak.
Ne félj a szememtől,
holtan is áldalak…
Szomorú vasárnap.



Here are three versions by three female singers each done in a different style, starting with Ms. Holiday, with the more optimistic finale that Diamanda Galás talks about when introducing the song to her audience (last version featured here):



The version by Lydia Lunch from her 1979 album "Queen of Siam":



And finally, the dark dionysian lady herself, Diamanda Galás:



Wednesday, December 28, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 151: SONG #181

Day 151: A forgotten favourite song from times ago

Who invented the effect of the "megaphone-voice"? Although many will think that Mark E, Smith was the one to get the credits, it seems to have been David McWilliams (1945-2002) from Northern Ireland. He wrote the magnificent song The Days of Pearly Spencer and first recorded it in 1967. The one who had the biggest success with a version of this song was Marc Almond, who charted with his cover in 1992 (top five). As McWilliams had lost the rights to his music by then due to some management failures, he did not receive a penny for that succes of his song. Although I do like some of Almond's records I do not think that his rendering of the song can match the original. Among the covers, the one I do like most is the recording of the song done by the French psychedelic group The Vietnam Veterans, featured here alongside McWilliams' original recording.





A tenement, a dirty street
Walked and worn by shoeless feet
Inside it's long and so complete
Watched by a shivering sun
Old eyes in a small child's face
Watching as the shadows race
Through walls and cracks and leave no trace
And daylight's brightness shuns

The days of Pearly Spencer
The race is almost run

Nose pressed hard on frosted glass
Gazing as the swollen mass
On concrete fields where grows no grass
Stumbles blindly on
Iron trees smother the air
But withering they stand and stare
Through eyes that neither know nor care
Where the grass is gone

The days of Pearly Spencer
The race is almost run

Pearly where's your milk white skin
What's that stubble on your chin
It's buried in the rot gut gin
You played and lost not won
You played a house that can't be beat
Now look your head's bowed in defeat
You walked too far along the street
Where only rats can run

The days of Pearly Spencer
The race is almost run
The days of Pearly spencer
The race is almost run



Tuesday, December 27, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 150 : SONG #180

Day 150: Some of my favourite songs of all time

As I have found out that this here blog has not included any songs by the Kinks until yesterday, I go on with three of my fav songs written by the great Ray Davies. There are funny songs he wrote (like Lola), there are poetic songs (like the one featured yesterday), straight rock tunes and there are - as I have already mentioned yesterday - songs to be considered better analyses of society than some works of (the not so good among the) sociologists. The following typical You Tube video (arranging stills and photographs that seem to fit the music and inserting the lyrics) brings to you the original version of one of those songs, "Dedicated Follower of Fashion", as recorded in 1966:




Another one of those sarcastic social commentaries that Ray Davies gave us is the well-known song about a well respected man doing the best things so conservatively, featured here in a live rendering from 1965 (the year it appeared on a single that reached #4 in the UK charts):




Cause he gets up in the morning,
And he goes to work at nine,
And he comes back home at five-thirty,
Gets the same train every time.
'Cause his world is built 'round punctuality,
It never fails.

And he's oh, so good,
And he's oh, so fine,
And he's oh, so healthy,
In his body and his mind.
He's a well respected man about town,
Doing the best things so conservatively.

And his mother goes to meetings,
While his father pulls the maid,
And she stirs the tea with councilors,
While discussing foreign trade,
And she passes looks, as well as bills
At every suave young man

'Cause he's oh, so good,
And he's oh, so fine,
And he's oh, so healthy,
In his body and his mind.
He's a well respected man about town,
Doing the best things so conservatively.

And he likes his own backyard,
And he likes his fags the best,
'Cause he's better than the rest,
And his own sweat smells the best,
And he hopes to grab his father's loot,
When Pater passes on.

'Cause he's oh, so good,
And he's oh, so fine,
And he's oh, so healthy,
In his body and his mind.
He's a well respected man about town,
Doing the best things so conservatively.

And he plays at stocks and shares,
And he goes to the Regatta,
And he adores the girl next door,
'Cause he's dying to get at her,
But his mother knows the best about
The matrimonial stakes.

'Cause he's oh, so good,
And he's oh, so fine,
And he's oh, so healthy,
In his body and his mind.
He's a well respected man about town,
Doing the best things so conservatively.

Last, not least, look at and listen to Ray Davies proving to be not only a wonderful songwriter but also a great performer on the German TV show Beatclub with a rendering of "Alcohol":



Here's a story about a sinner,
He used to be a winner who enjoyed a life of prominence and position,
But the pressures at the office and his socialite engagements,
And his selfish wife's fanatical ambition,
It turned him to the booze,
And he got mixed up with a floosie
And she led him to a life of indecision.
The floosie made him spend his dole
She left him lying on Skid Row
A drunken lag in some Salvation Army Mission.
It's such a shame.

Oh demon alcohol,
Sad memories I cannot recall,
Who thought I would say,
Damn it all and blow it all,
Oh demon alcohol,
Memories I cannot recall,
Who thought I would fall a slave to demon alcohol.
Sad memories I cannot recall,
Who thought I would fall a slave to demon alcohol.

Barley wine, pink gin,
He'll drink anything,
Port, pernod or tequila,
Rum, scotch, vodka on the rocks,
As long as all his troubles disappeared.
But he messed up his life, went and beat up his wife,
And the floosie's gone and found another sucker
She's gonna turn him on to drink
She's gonna lead him to the brink
And when his money's gone,
She'll leave him in the gutter,
It's such a shame.

Oh demon alcohol,
Sad memories I cannot recall,
Who thought I would say,
Damn it all and blow it all,

Sad memories I cannot recall,
Who thought I would fall,
A slave to demon alcohol.

"Floosie" is my word of the year 1971, when the ninth album of the Kinks, Muswell Hillbillies, was released, from where this song is taken. There is also a live version on disc 2 of the 1972 album "Everybody's in Show Biz". As a bonus track, you can listen to and look at a live version of "Dedicated Follower of Fashion", that demonstrates Ray Davies'qualities as a show-man. You will have to follow the link,since embedding is de-activated for that one on UTube:

http://youtu.be/tqXrAHuLksU

Monday, December 26, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 149: SONG #179

Day 149: A Song from Your Childhood


Still one of the most underrated bands from the sixties in my opinion, the Kinks are at least to be considered a legendary group for some of the fine songs Ray Davies wrote and for some of his social comments in his lyrics, the likes as "Dedicated Follower of Fashion" or "Well Respected Man", and, not to forget, "Demon Alcohol". Being known for some rather straight-forward rock tunes ("You Really Got Me" and the notorious "Lola", for example) on the one hand, they have also contributed rather poetic songs to the song book of popular music on the other hand, like "Days" (there are versions of that song by Kirsty MacColl and Elvis Costello amongst others) and the one Kinks song that I have most often in mind: Waterloo Sunset. It belongs to my childhood (primary school days) when i frequently used to listen to Kinks tunes on the radio. They were among my favourite bands although I did not understand the lyrics back then. Here is a video from UTUBE featuring the song in good audio quality - everybody knows it, i have heard it a thousand times or more, nevertheless, it is still beautiful:





Dirty old river must you keep rolling flowing into the night
people so busy make me feel dizzy taxi light shines so bright
but I don't need no friends
as long as I gaze on Waterloo Sunset I am in paradise
Every day I look at the world from my window
but chilly chilly is the evening time Waterloo Sunset's fine
Terry meets Julie Waterloo Station every Friday night
but I am so lazy don't want to wander I stay at home at night
but I don't feel afraid
as long as I gaze on Waterloo Sunset I am in paradise
Every day I look at the world from my window
but chilly chilly is the evening time Waterloo Sunset's fine
Millions of people swarming like flies 'round Waterloo Underground
but Terry and Julie cross over the river where they feel safe and sound
and they don't need no friends
as long as they gaze on Waterloo Sunset they are in paradise
Waterloo Sunset's fine

1000 SONGS - DAY 148: SONG #178

Day 148: Statistics and a Song about Pain

I have spent some time doing statistics of this blog and have also tried to find new links for all those links that have been "killed" in the meantime. I did succeed with the exception of two songs, Serge Gainsbourg's "Dieu et Juif" and Bob Dylan's "Wigwam". As there are always problems with Rob Zimmermann's songs on UTube, I will never ever feature a song by Dylan again. That does not mean there weren't any worthy to be featured here. For the complete


from Dec 23.2010 to Dec 24.2011 click on the link above. It says, that the 1000 Songs Challenge in its first year has had 177 postings, which featured 405 tracks and 315 songs (90 tracks being alternative versions of some of the songs). I did not look at the number of songs contributed by the respective artists. Maybe I'll do that later on.
Now for today's song, which is Song # 316 in Posting # 178. It is a song about Pain by Josh Rouse (the first song by Mr. Rouse I came to know), from his 2002 album "Under Cold Blue Stars". There is not much to say about the song but that it is really beautiful and one of the songs I have on constant replay once I have listened to them - at nearly every instance of doing so.



Saturday, December 24, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 147: SONG #177

Day 147: A Song That Is A Very Clever Rendering of Another Song We All Like

When I first heard this song (thank you, Hermann Doerfler!) I immediately thought, that this guy will be sued for royalties by Bob Zimmerman. I sat down to write an e-mail to my friend Hermann about plagiarism, and in that very moment the song switched to the original it is taken from. He ain't done nothing else than to use a sample and to re-interpret the lyrics or so. This seemed to be way better than the ordinary cover-version that changes the rhythmic structure of the song or the like. And it is one of the principles of today's music: quote, improvise, re-arrange. That is creativity, whatever a lawyer (see verse one of the lyrics) might think or do about it. And, Ramsay Midwood is a fine commentator on the nation's status quo, methinks. Since yesterday I have his songs on constant replay, a fine cure against the remnants of X-Mas songs in my soul.





Doctors and lawyers they wont do nothing for you
the parking attendant is a tax and I spend it
suck it from the poor make another war
catch the details on the tv news at four
my old man says that's a paranoid construction,
cast your vote in the November election
I'm too tired to protest it.
I dont even know if Im against it

Home of the free land of the free
when did everyone start picking on me?
I'm just trying to get from here to there
I swear to the Lord I treat everybody fair
and I dont want no sympathy,
a shake, a howdy or a cup of tea
and that's my state of mind right now
I think I'll go out and eat a cow
and that's the truth as I know it to be
here in the land, the land of the free
and if you dont like it you can kiss my ass
cause I drive a monster truck

That's my state of mind right now
I think I'll go out and eat a cow
and that's the truth as I know it to be
here in the land, the land of the free
and if you dont like it you can kiss my ass
cause I drive a monster truck

And I don’t care how many letters they sent
The morning came and the morning went
Pack up your money and pack up your tent
Lord, you ain’t goin’ nowhere

Whoo-ee! ride me high
tomorrow’s the day
my bride’s gonna come
and, Oh, oh, are we gonna fly
lord, down in the easy chair!


Here is the Dylan-song, in the version that made it famous, done by Roger Mc Guinn and friends (and I promise, that this blog will feature some more songs by Ramsay Midwood later on):



Clouds so swift
Rain won’t lift
Gate won’t close
Railings froze
Get your mind off wintertime
You ain’t goin’ nowhere
Whoo-ee! Ride me high
Tomorrow’s the day
My bride’s gonna come
Oh, oh, are we gonna fly
Down in the easy chair!

I don’t care
How many letters they sent
Morning came and morning went
Pick up your money
And pack up your tent
You ain’t goin’ nowhere
Whoo-ee! Ride me high
Tomorrow’s the day
My bride’s gonna come
Oh, oh, are we gonna fly
Down in the easy chair!

Buy me a flute
And a gun that shoots
Tailgates and substitutes
Strap yourself
To the tree with roots
You ain’t goin’ nowhere
Whoo-ee! Ride me high
Tomorrow’s the day
My bride’s gonna come
Oh, oh, are we gonna fly
Down in the easy chair!

Genghis Khan
He could not keep
All his kings
Supplied with sleep
We’ll climb that hill no matter how steep
When we get up to it
Whoo-ee! Ride me high
Tomorrow’s the day
My bride’s gonna come
Oh, oh, are we gonna fly
Down in the easy chair!

Monday, December 19, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 146: SONG #176

Day 146: A Song the Audience Knows All the Word to

Robert Earl Keen from Texas, USA, has already been featured in the 1000 Somgs Challenge on May 23, 2011, in the category "Songs about Drinking"; here is a song about wedding and about gringos and a song that also fits into the category of the day in the original 30 Days Song Challenge, because I can play it on the drums (at least I think, I can..,). Featured here is a rather recent live version, you can look out for other versions on UTube. As many other REK songs, this one is a grower: the more you listen to it, the bigger it gets, until you are a member of the audience knowing all the words:




We were standin' on a mountain top
Where the cactus flowers grow
I was wishin' that the world would stop
When you said we'd better go

We took a rowboat 'cross the Rio Grande
Captain Pablo was our giude
For two dollars in a weathered hand
He rowed us to the other side

And we were dreamin' like the end was not in sight
And we dreamed all afternoon
We asked the world to wait so we could celebrate
A gringo honeymoon

We stepped out onto the golden sand
The sun was high and burning down
Rented donkeys from an old blind man
Saddled up and rode to town

Tied our donkeys to an ironwood tree
By the street where the children play
We walked in the first place we could see
Servin' cold beer in the shade

We were drinkin' like the end was not in sight
And we drank all afternoon
We asked the world to wait so we could celebrate
A gringo honeymoon

Met a cowboy who said that he
Was running from the DEA
He left a home, a wife, a family
When he made his getaway

We followed him on down a street of dust
To his one room run-down shack
He blew a smoke ring and he smiled at us
I ain't never goin' back

We were flyin' like the end was not in sight
And we soared all afternoon
We asked the world to wait so we could celebrate
A gringo honeymoon

He said there's one last place that you should go
He took us to the town's best bar
He knew a crusty caballero
Who played an old gut string guitar

And he sang like Marty Robbins could
Played like no one I've known
For a while we knew that life was good
It was ours to take back home

We were singin' like the end was not in sight
And we sang all afternoon
We asked the world to wait so we could celebrate
A gringo honeymoon

We were standin' on a mountain top
Where the cactus flowers grow
I was wishin' that the world would stop
When you said we'd better go

Saturday, December 17, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 145: SONG #175

Day 145: A Song That Makes Me Laugh


They Might Be Giants is a band whose songs are normally humorous. As a rule, they make me smile at least. In 2009, they released the album "Here Comes Science" containing songs that explains science to kids. That way, I began to understand, what science might be about. I really love their rendering of the work a paleontologist does, very funny video in my humble opinion:


Friday, December 16, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 144: SONG #174

Day 144: A Song to Be Played at My Funeral


Back in 1988, "Alternative Rock" seems to have been invented or so by a british group called The Godfathers, the follow-up band of The Sid Presley Experience. The song that gave the title to their first album is worth to be danced to at any funeral, a straight rock tune that immediately sets a person's locomotor system into motion (unless s/he is dead), and it is also a noteworthy comment on the life we live:






Been turned around till I'm upside down
Been all at sea until I've drowned
And I've felt torture, I've felt pain
Just like that film with Michael Caine
I've been abused and I've been confused
And I've kissed Margaret Thatcher's shoes
And I been high and I been low
And I don't know where to go

Birth, school, work, death
Birth, school, work, death

And heroin was the love you gave
From the cradle to the grave
Boys and girls don't understand
The devil makes work for idle hands
I cut myself but I don't bleed
'Cause I don't get what I need
Doesn't matter what I say
Tomorrow's still another day

Birth, school, work, death
Birth, school, work, death

Yeah I been high and I been low
And I don't know where to go
I'm living on the never never never
This time it's gonna be forever
I'll live and die don't ask me why
I wanna go to paradise
And I don't need your sympathy
There's nothing in this world for me

Birth, school, work, death
Birth, school, work, death

Birth, school, work, death
Birth, school, work, death
Birth, school, work, death
Birth, school, work, death

Thursday, December 15, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 143: SONG #173

Day 143: A Song to Be Played at A Wedding


You'll Never Walk Alone by Rodgers & Hammerstein certainly is a song that fits to a wedding ceremony. It has been interpreted by thousands of artitsts, among them some pretty prominent ones. To get into the song and its feeling I recommend Satchmo's rendering of it:




Then we will go on with the sound of the song (that remains the same) accordimg to the aesthetic rules and regulations of the Gospel genre. As such it has been recorded by the Queen of Soul herself, the wonderful Aretha Franklin, with a Baptist Choir in a Baptist Church (she is the daughter of a Baptist minister) on the album Amazing Grace - a rather lengthy version, indeed (as one would expect of a combined soul and gospel undertaking).



My favourite version is done on the piano without any singing by Nina Simone:



Whatever I might think about Elvis, his version is one of the very fine renderings that involve singing:



I do not include the Johnny Cash version here, but that does not mean that I would not appreciate it. But I cannot leave out the recording of the song by Gerry and the Pacemakers, as this is the version that has inspired the use of the song as a football anthem, first and foremost among the supporters of Liverpool FC:


And here they are, the supporters of Liverpool FC:

Monday, December 12, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 142: SONG #172

Day 142: A Song You Listen to When You Are Sad

There is a subgenre of Indie-Rock that is called "Sadcore" or "Slowcore" respectively. I came to know the slowcore heroes and co-founders of this genre, CODEINE, back then when Frigid Stars, their first album, was released. Wikipedia tells me it is on Glitterhouse but I am sure my copy is on SubPop. Be that as it may, I will come back to other artists labelled as sadcore (like CatPower and Stina Nordenstam) later on, and post two songs from Frigid Stars that I did remember, The Pickup Song and Cave In, right here:




Sunday, December 11, 2011

1000 LIEDER -TAG 141: LIED #171

Tag 141: Ein Lied, das ich höre, wenn ich glücklich bin

Ein Lied, das nicht nur zum Glücklichsein gut ist, sondern auch dafür, wieder mal zu beweisen, wie lässig Berlin ist: Depressiver Tag von Brittas Album Das Schöne Leben. Christiane Rösinger ist offenbar auch eher lässig, was sie seit den Lassie-Singers-Tagen unter Beweis zu stellen scheint oder so. Hier ist jedenfalls mal Depressiver Tag:


Ich will mit keinem reden und ich will nicht ins Café
Alles was draußen liegt tut weh
In meinen drei, vier Wänden steh ich still und stumm
Und draußen lungerst du herum

Immer wieder, immer wieder
Muss ich zum Fenster gehen
Immer wieder sinnlos
Runter auf die Straße sehen

Depressiver Tag, ich sag hall-oh-oh-ohoh-oh
Zeig mir dein schäbiges Gesicht

Depressiver Tag, du machst mich fro-oh-oh-ohoh-oh
Komm und enttäusche mich nicht

Ein Tisch, ein Stuhl, ein Bett, ein Schrank und ein Regal
Und alle sind mir so egal
Ein Stück Himmel, ein Kamin und auch ein Dach
Draußen ist die Welt so flach

Immer wieder, immer wieder
Muss ich zum Fenster gehn
Immer wieder sinnlos
Runter auf die Straße shen

Depressiver Tag, ich sag hall-oh-oh-ohoh-oh
Zeig mir dein schäbiges Gesicht
Depressiver Tag, du machst mich fro-oh-oh-oh-oh
Komm und enttäusche mich nicht

Depressiver Tag, how do you do-oh-oh-ohoh-oh?
Und stell dich bitte nicht so
Depressiver Tag, denn auch du-uh-uh-uhuh-uh
Bist nur 24 Stunden lang

Depressiver Tag, ich sag hall-oh-oh-ohoh-oh
Zeig mir dein schäbiges Gesicht
Depressiver Tag, du machst mich wo-oh-oh-oh-oh
Komm und enttäusche mich nicht

Und als Bonus Track ein Lassie-Singers-Klassiker, der mich auch so richtig glücklich macht:



Und das Ganze dann nochmals unplugged aus einer Stadt, die auch nicht so übel ist, wie ich meine:








Friday, December 9, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 140: SONG #170

Day 140: The Ultimate Esoteric Song

Whatever Esotericism may be about, time is eternal and the Ancients of MuMu are the prophets of this very message. Bill Drummond, having been a central person in the British Music Industry for a long time, later became one of the main persons behind KLF - The Copyright Liberation Front - the propagators of which later showed their disrespect for that very business by burning a million pound sterling - you can read it all on the respective Wikipedia entries, so I do not have to bring it into any particular order here. KLF, the one and only act ever to bring together danceable music, nightclubs, science fiction, illuminati, rituals and aesthetics of religion and whatever else would be of any interest to the educated person, have recorded a song about time being eternal (why at exactly 3:am, my dear illuminati, think about that). The song is more than just great and so is the video; maybe this should be played at my funeral: "Justified Ancient Liberation Zulu Got to teach and everything you learn will point to the fact that time is eternal 3:AM". But it is exactly at that moment, that KLF will have left the building, my dear.

Thursday, December 8, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 139: SONG #169

Day 139: A Song from One of Your Favourite Albums

Nancy & Lee is one of the many favourite items in my collection of records. It contains that very fine song about Phaedra and how she gave me life, called Some Velvet Morning. There is not much to say about Lee Hazlewood, as every sensible person that loves music will agree on his merits in the field in question. There may be some discussions about the worth of his collaboration with Nancy Sinatra. In my opinion, people that put the quality of that work into question are just blockheads. Be that as it may, the record is a classic and this one song the more, using musical expression to relate to gender roles, leaving it open, whether this is a simple description or a comment:



There are some fine covers that show the quality of the song. One that sticks very closely to the way it has been done on the original recording is the rendering by Glenn Richards and Amanda Brown, the lady who has once been the violinist of my favourite Aussie band, the great Go Betweens:



Another version featuring an (already dead) Aussie who has played in at least two of my favourite down-under-acts (Birthday Party and Crime and the City Solution) is the one done by Lydia Lunch and Rowland S. Howard (both of them have already been featured on this here blog, check that out!). This can be looked at as a parody in the greek sense (parodia / παρῳδία ) of the word: an imitation that is set against the original without necessarily ridiculing it. Listen carefully to how they interpret the male and female roles in the song:




Another, straightforward, version was put forth by Thin White Rope. It has already been featured in the "1000 Songs Challenge" as a bonus track. Here it is to be heard once more, "off the records", but contextualised w/ respect to the gendering of the chose by simply replacing the male singer by his female guitar in the respective parts of the song:

1000 SONGS - DAY 138: SONG #168

DAY 138: A Song You Would Like to Hear on the Radio

There are songs that work perfectly when driving. Although I do not even possess a driver's licence, for me, there are certain songs that really fit the experience of going by car. I once read an interview with Tom Petty in which he stated that he would test the songs he had written by listening to them when driving. I first heard Refugee on the radio, I would enjoy to hear it on the radio when traveling by car, and it is my favourite TP-song. Imagine a sunny day an endless highway and this song:




Tuesday, December 6, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 137: SONG #167

DAY 137: A Song From The Radio

I first heard this song on the radio in 1980, when it was released on the self-titled debut album of the Psychedelic Furs. (On the same radio show on the same day, I first heard, "Heaven" by the Talking Heads from their Fear of Music album). The lyrics also prominently feature the word "radio", and the Furs first called themselves "RKO"- after "RKO Picures, I guess - a famous film-studio featured in the lyrics of "Science Fiction/Double Feature" from the Rocky Horror Picture show. Then they called themselves "Radio" and it took some more tries to find their proper name. If I remember it rightly, I did not buy a copy of the album before the first half of the nineties. Nevertheless, it has always been one of my favoured dark existentialist songs.




stupid on the steinway
o sick upon a steinway
the sailors drown
see them talk and see them drown
and see them drink and fall around
upon the floor

sister of mine, home again
sister of mine, home again

lonely in a crowded room
the radio plays out of tune
so silently
the radio upon the floor
is stupid, it plays aznavour
so out of key

sister of mine, home again
sister of mine, home again

broken on a ship of fools
even dreams must fall to rules
so stupidly
words are all just useless sound
just like cards, they fall around
and we will be

sister of mine, home again
sister of mine, home again
ah ssss...

buy a car and watch it rust
sister see them fall to dust
they fall around
in another crowded room
paint me like the shirt i'm in
honestly

sister of mine, home again
sister of mine, home again
ah ssss...

sister of mine
sister of mine
sister of mine
sister of mine

Saturday, December 3, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 136: SONG #166

Day 136: A Song That I Have Always Loved

This is a song from my childhood, a song that I have always thought to be one among the few very fine songs one will always love (there was a pub in Vienna I only went to because they had it in their Wurlitzer) and finally, it became famous again for being featured in Pulp Fiction. No more comment needed:


Friday, December 2, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 135: SONG #165

Day 135: A Song About the Dude

Day 15 in the Song Challenge is a song that describes me. A song that most people know for the Kenny Rogers version of it and a song that describes the condition a person is in, is "I Just dropped in (to see what condition my condition was in)", and it might be known to most people who know it for being a part of the soundtrack of The Big Lebowski by the Coen Brothers. Here is the original version by the guy who wrote the song, Mickey Newbury:



The song is best understood as a Soul/Funk tune, as in the rendering of Bettye Lavette:



Even better presented by Sharon Jones and the Dap Kings (although somebody on YouTUbe called it 'nothing but a cover of the cover by Bettye Lavette'):



To be sure. here is the instrumental version:


And now: for something completely different, German band "Die Haut" with a version from their classic album "Headless Body in Topless Bar", w/ singer Nick Cave:


Wednesday, November 30, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 134: SONG #164

DAY 134: Songs Normally Regarded as Alternative

"A song no-one expects you to love" is the original category of day 14 within the 30-days song-challenge. Herewith I declare, that the songs I post here are songs I love as everybody would expect me to do (at least of the persons that know me). Nevertheless, as the title of the post says, they are regarded as being outside of the mainstream. Fewer persons than those who know, f.e., Shakira, do know Fred Frith, who is capable of playing a load of different instruments, is regarded as belonging to the Avant-Garde or simply to be a (genius of a) musician in the alternative genre (whatever the alternative offered by him might be). He was a member of Henry Cow and later on was known as part of such acts as The Skeleton Crew. There is also a book by Stephen King called Skeleton Crew. And there is a movie called "Step Across the Border" that is about Fred and features his music. Accordingly, you can "own" the following "Sparrow Song" by buying a record called "Step Across the Border", containing the soundtrack to the movie mentioned above:



And there is a song by Fred Frith called "Too Much Too Little", featured in the same movie:



Fred Frith has also been a member of a band called "The Art Bears", along with Chris Cutler and Dagmar Krause. The latter has already been mentioned on that blog with respect to her collaboration with Kevin Coyne (I attended their show in 1978 or 79 at the Oval House in London). Cutler and Krause were also part of News from Babel; from their first record, here it is, ANNO MIRABILIS:

Sunday, November 27, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 133: SONG #163

Day 133: A Song that is a Guilty Pleasure

I never understood, what that should be, a guilty pleasure; but maybe it has something to do with sex (which has something to do with guilt in some circumstances to some people religious); be that as it may, this song is a pleasure, Nick Cave's Ship Song:

Saturday, November 26, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 132: SONG #162

Day 132: A Cover version I like

This is Nina Simone doing a version of one of the most widely known songs by Leonard Cohen:




And this is Nick Cave with a version of a Cohen song that might not be so widely known as "Suzanne":



And this is the original recording by Mr. Cohen himself:

Thursday, November 24, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 131: SONG #161

DAY 131: A Song from Your Favourite Band in the Library of Congress National Recording Registry

The selection criteria for the Library of Congress National Recording Registry state, that recordings selected for the National Recording Registry are those that are culturally, historically or aesthetically important, and/or inform or reflect life in the United States. Among the rock recordings that obviously match that criterion there are to be found Patti Smith's Horses, an album by REM and Nirvana's Nevermind; from the genre of Hip Hop, amongst others, Fear of a Black Planet by Public Enemy. Some fav's of mine among them, truly. Back in the days, when "Daydream Nation" was released, Sonic Youth were certainly among my favourite bands, and Daydream Nation may be my favourite Sonic Youth album (it also seems to be their most critically acclaimed recording). Opening Track, Teenage Riot, great track:


Monday, November 21, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 130: SONG #160

Day 130: Two more Songs by Christian Kjellvander

Christian Kjellvander, a wonderful Swedish Singer/Songwriter has already been featured in the 1000-Songs-Challenge with the song "Polish Daughter". Today this blog features two more songs that highlight Mr. Kjellvander's capability of writing songs that bring tears to my eyes, tracks #7 & 8 from his 2007 album I Saw Her From Here, I Saw Here From Her: "While the Birches Weep" and "The Road". Here are the lyrics of "While the Birches Weep", included because I did not have to type them (lyrics are featured in the booklet of the CD), but found a place to copy from:

My eyes have seen more beauty than my heart could ever hold
Outside and all around us a picture no camera can take and it is cold
But we all have stories of fires that we love to tell,
but it's the fires within the fires that drew me to you
As to live is to die and I will grieve by your side 'til the day comes
when all that love is lifted from your eye
Found ourselves a village after thousand nights a blur
Fell right before me and I could see here from her
There are angels passing through trying to grab a hold of you,
but we both stand aside like old lovers do
As to live is to die and I will grieve by your side 'til the day comes
when all that love is lifted from your eye
Bury you in the yard, bury you in my arms and watch you sleep
Carry you through the yard, carry you in my arms,
while the birches weep

On this U-tube-link you'll find the version from the album with pictures I do not always appreciate as fitting to the music, but at this here pots is for the music.




"The Road", in a live version with some bugs in the audio, but I hope it makes you want to buy CK's records:

Sunday, November 20, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 129: SONG #159

TAG 129: Ein Lied, zu dem ich tanzen kann

Manchmal muss man auf Deutsch schreiben, und manchmal muss man daran denken, dass Tanzen nicht nur darin besteht, alles zu schütteln und an allem zu rütteln und dieses und jenes mit seinen Gliedmaßen der mehr oder vielmehr weniger staunenden Umwelt mitzuteilen. Man weiß ja inzwischen, dass die einen nicht so aufmerksam beobachtet, wie es der Selbstdarsteller will oder vielmehr fürchtet. Manchmal muss man daran denken, das Tanzen auch eine Form der Intimität sein kann, dann vor allem, wenn langsam getanzt wird. Das beruhigt und lenkt ab von einem selbst und man hat plötzlich Raum und Zeit an Vieles zu denken, was so vorkommt im Leben außerhalb der eigenen Introspektion, und auch wenn man dabei dann an Sven Regener denkt und an Element of Crime und daran, dass das wirkliche Poesie ist, was die so liefern, am Ende denkt man dann an die Eine



Friday, November 18, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 128: SONG #158

Day 128: A Song You Know All the Word to

This is Maceo Parker again - famous (not only) for being the saxophone player of the horn section of the James Brown band - on WDR, introducing members of his band. This is as funky as James Brown could possibly be. The introduction of the band is not the part I know all the words to, but to the song that serves as the framework of this introduction. And once again, if you do not feel like having to shake everything you've got when listening to this performance, you are dead (or seriously ill). Enjoy!

Thursday, November 17, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 127: SONG #157

Day 127: A Song that Reminds Me of Itself

In the original 30 days song challenge, day 07 is "a song that reminds me of a certain event"; on day 07 I chose a song by Jethro Tull. I did not remember that choice until now when I decided to really post the song I had in mind today under that category I had changed to "a song that reminds me of itself (for lack of events?). By chance, the latter is also a song by Ian Anderson, from his 1974 War Child album (I thought it was from 76 or something like this). I did own the album when I was a teenager and I always remembered that song as the one worthy to be remembered from it. This may be for the verses of which I know that I did like from the very first time I heard this song:

Well do you ever get the feeling
That the story's to damn real
and in the present - tense
or that everybody's on the stage
and it seems like you're the only
person sitting in the - audience?


Sunday, November 13, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 126: SONG #156

Day 126: A Song that Reminds Me of Somewhere

This song reminds me of Jesolo, Italia, a place where my parents used to spend their holidays (witb my brothers and me) in Hotel Luxor or Hotel Cairo, both of them overseen by a man of Romanian descent (a guy called Bruno), despite their Egyptian names. Year after year we went there to lie on the beach, play boccia, meet the same families, swim, build sandcastles, eat pasta and strange kinds of cheese (those were the sixties and the early seventies, italian food was something really exotic to us) and the like. One of my first memories is a little shop around the corner where there was a Wurlitzer. And I remember to have put some Lira into that Wurlitzer to listen to Adriano Celentano's Una Festa Sui Prati, and I remember Italian guys cheering when hearing it. But maybe this is just a dream...


1000 SONGS - DAY 125: SONG #155

Day 125: A Song that Reminds You of Someone


This song reminds me of Marie Trintignant, the daughter of Jean Luis Trintignant. The latter actor has played the character of Julien Vercel in one of my favourite movies, Vivement Dimanche!. A Ton Étoile is a song by the French "Alternative Rock" group Noir Desir. The singer is Bertrand Cantat, who has been convicted for murder (not homicide, if I got it right) of Marie in Vilnius in 2003. Quand on a pas le choix, il nous reste le coeur. If you do not have any choice, the heart remains (or however you would say that in English). Thx to Nagy Gábor who reminded me of the song.



Saturday, November 12, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 124: SONG #154

Day 124: A Song that Makes You Sad


Dirty Old Town is a song written by Ewan MacColl that has been interpreted by many a singer. For me, it is associated with the melancholical mood, therefore I dug it to be listed among the songs that make me sad, although this is not the right word. I came to know the song when I was just a little boy, because there is a fine version of it on Rod Stewart's first album "An Old Raincoat Won't Ever Let You Down". Whatever you might think of Rod - maybe you know him only for his "Do Ya Think I'm Sexy-Disco-Era" - this is an extraordinarily fine album (featuring, among others, Ron "good looking" Wood), and his version of the classic really is appreciable:



In a post on that song, one has to include the original recording by the one who wrote it:



Maybe it is for The Pogues and their lead singer Shane McGowan that a load of people know that tune today, so here is a version from the days when they all were pretty young (I apologise for the guiness commercial at the start):




Next one is a rendition of the song by a slightly older Shane accompanied by two old men on the guitar (embedding not allowed, watch it on utube):

DIRTY OLD TOWN

Kirsty MacColl, the daughter of Ewan, died in a tragic accident in 2000 . I do not know whether there is a version of DOT done by her (I guess there are some live versions of the song by the Pogues featuring her). Anyway, there is a song she has recorded together with the Pogues and Shane about Christmas Evening (drawing near, my friends, drawing near, as I write this), Fairytale of New York, here it is, as the bonus track of this here post:



Friday, November 11, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 123: SONG # 153

Day 123: A Song that Makes You Happy

From one of the best albums by Brian Eno, "I'll come running" is one of my all time favourite songs and also one that always makes me happy when listening to it. It features Robert Fripp on the guitar (like 2 other songs from "Another Green World", "St. Elmo's Fire" and "Golden Hours"). I also remember that in the second half of the 70ies, my wife and me (we were not married then... ) attended a concert by David Bowie in Wiener Stadthalle and before the gig or in between the supporting act and Bowie's appearance on stage, this song was to be heard. It was the time of the Eno-Bowie-collaboration and I think it was the "Heroes"-tour. I danced to it and suggested to her that I would always be the one who came running to tie her shoes, if she needed it...



I'll find a place somewhere in the corner
I'm gonna waste the rest of my days
Just watching patiently from the window
Just waiting, seasons change, some day, oh oh,
My dreams will pull you through that garden gate

I want to be the wandering sailor
We're silhouettes by the light of the moon
I sit playing solitaire by the window
Just waiting, seasons change, ah hah, you'll see
Some day these dreams will pull you through my door

And I'll come running to tie your shoe

Honoring Robert Fripp and remembering that it was just yesterday morning that I had this track in mind when waking up what made me think about "Another Green World2, here is a bonus track from the same album, St. Elmo's Fire:


1000 SONGS - DAY 122: SONG # 152

Day 122: A Song to Take You to the Heart of Darkness

Minimalistic music, minimalistic lyrics, great performance from the days of a new wave. Wire, called an art-punk or post-punk band by wikipedia, with a live performance of a song of great emotions rendered nearly without any emotion, Heartbeat:



I feel icy
I feel cold
I feel old
Is there something there behind me?
I'm sublime

I feel empty
I feel dark
I remark
I am mesmerized
By my own beat
Like a heartbeat
(In it's own beat)

In 1987, Steve Albini's Big Black did a cover version of the classic song worth to listen to:


Thursday, November 10, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 121: SONG # 151

DAY 121: Yer Another One of My Favourite Songs

Vengo de donde hay un río, tabaco y cañaveral, donde el sudor del guajiro hasta a la tierra soñar. Compay Segundo de Cuba. The Orishas, as far as I know the only rappers from Cuba who came to be known in the world outside of Fidel Castros rule, are named after the Yorùbá divinities that are also revered in Cuban Santerìa, the Orisha. My favourite song of this Cuban band is 537 Cuba, for the fine way in which they use the sample from Compay Segundo's song. As I am teaching the introductory course to West African Religions riht now once more, the song seems to be a good choice to start the next round of 30 songs. Enjoy it

Wednesday, November 9, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 120: SONG # 150

Day 120: Your Favourite Song Some Time Ago

Glam Rock Rules! The Slider by T. Rex is one of my favourite Glam Rock albums, and my favourite song from it is "Ballrooms of Mars", which was also my favourite song from the album back in those times whence it stems. Marc Bolan died in car accident, and in a way, it seems he did soundingly so, as I could not imagine him as an aged person. No phrases here about those who die young. Bolan was simply cool in an era with producer-pop on the one hand and so called progressive music and art rock on the other, word. Ballrooms of Mars features everything that was great in T. Rex: Bolan's soft voice with just the right amount of reverb, laid-back slow-rock tempo, a guitar solo based upon just a few notes, and cryptic lyrics with a load of nice allusions and alliterations like lizard leather boots, ROCK:



you gonna look fine
be primed for dancing
you're gonna trip and glide
all on the trembling plane
your diamond hands
will be stacked with roses
and wind and cars
and people of the past

i'll call you thing
just when the moon sings
and place your face in stone
upon the hills of stars
and gripped in the arms
of the changeless madman
we'll dance our lives away
in the ballrooms of mars

you talk about day
i'm talking 'bout night time
when the monsters call out
the names of men
bob dylan knows
and i bet alan freed did
there are things in night
that are better not to behold

you dance
with your lizard leather boots on
and pull the strings
that change the faces of men
you diamond browed hag
you're a gutter-gaunt gangster
john lennon knows your name
and i've seen his

A bonus track from Slider, "Main Man", featuring one of the best lines in rock lyrics ever: "Bolan likes to rock now, yes he does, yes he does":




Tuesday, November 8, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 119: SONG # 149

Day 119: A Song From Your Childhood

A song from at least, my younger years, "Hotel Room" by the Edgar Broughton Band, a song that rests on one chord for a long time until they decide to bring in another one; but the best thing about it is the break of the drummer when he marks the end of the bridge and the beginning of the chorus (he uses it happily ever after); for a long time this has shaped my idea of a cool drum part.


Monday, November 7, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 118: SONG # 148

Day 118: Another Song About Guilt

Johnny Cash wrote a classic song about guilt, the Folsom Prison Blues, containing the famous line: "I shot a man in Reno, just to watch him die". It was first released on December 15, 1955, on Sun Records. Cash is known for many many things, among them his shows in prisons (most famous the ones in San Quentin State Prison, resulting in the album At San Quentin), and I do like the reading of this that says, that he wanted to show that people in prison are still to be regarded as human beings. Be that as it may, listen to the original Sun recording, a rather slow version of the song compared to the way it was done later in live shows:



As part of a tribute album to the great JC, Keb'Mo' has delivered a very fine version of the song (changing the famous line to "but that was just a lie"). His version explains why this song is called the Folsom Prison BLUES:



Finally, a rendering of the song as done live by Johnny himself in prison:

Sunday, November 6, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 117: SONG # 147

DAY 117: A Song You Wish You Would Have Written

I wish I would have written Herbie Hancock's Cantaloupe Island, featured on HH's 1964 album "Empyrean Isles", with Freddie Hubbard on cornet, Ron Carter on bass and Tony Williams on drums (what a band!!); the original recording goes like this:



The tune became known to a wider public than the average jazz-audience because a sample of it is the backbone of US3's "Cantaloop" from 1993, sometimes categorized as cool hip hop, sometimes as acid jazz or rap-jazz. Here it is:


Finally a live rendition of the tune featuring one of my all time heroes among the world's distinguished drummers, Vinnie Colaiuta:

Saturday, November 5, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 116: SONG # 146

DAY 116: A Song you can play on the drums and that will please you












No comment needed, it will please you, special k. will really please you:



param pam pam param pam!!

Tuesday, November 1, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 115: SONG # 145

TAG 115: Ein Lustiges Lied

Nicht nur lustig, sondern auch musikalisch super, Helge Schneiders Käsebrot live:


Saturday, October 29, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 114: SONG # 144

DAY 114: Songs I Would Like to Hear at My Funeral

On former entries on songs I'd like to hear at my funeral, I have emphasised that I'd like to see people dance at my funeral (if there is any chance to see or hear something at your own funeral). Be that as it may, a funeral is also a good opportunity for people attending to stop and think, repent, pledge and go on in their senseless ways afterwards. With this in mind I recommend to the MC of my funeral to have at least one break in the dancing and feasting to listen to the following three songs; one by an old man (it was written, when he was younger, but it seems to fit him better as he has grown old (not bitter...)), the Sisters of Mercy by the great LC. Everybody has to think about mercy at a funeral.



Other two songs by Gillian Welch, People who have been followers of this here blog might have noticed that she is among my favourite singer/songwriters, and very near to the top of the list. First one is about the fear to die, one thing that people should reflect on when attending a funeral.



Second one (I have posted a live-version of this song on this blog before, but not on the 1000-songs-challenge), is a gospel, and cynical as I might be when it comes to religion, I was raised a Christian and I do have respect for my saviour. And this is a song that could convince a sinner to repent. As there are only live versions of lower audio quality and some videos full of religious kitsch, here is a non-embedeable version, just a LINK

As a bonus track, a song about a drunkard at his mother's grave - who came one day to late for her funeral - as sung by Johnny Cash, the one and only:


Friday, October 28, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 113: SONG # 143

Day 113: Some songs about relationships featuring the one and only Sally Timms

When thinking about a song that would fit neatly into the category "Wedding Songs" the rare 12" by a side project of the long-time Mekons' vocalist, Sally Timms and the Drifting Cowgirls that features a duet with Marc Almond came to my mind. This will be the last song in this post, as I will start with Sally's renditions of a song that has been sung by Johnny Cash:

This song is taken from the first record of the man in black and written by him: Cry! Cry! Cry! Sally changes the rhythm of the original, but she does not change gender-roles, as she also has neither done on her rendering of the Rolling Stones Macho-Anthem "Heart of Stone" nor on her version of "Long Black Veil" (a song also recorded by Johnny Cash and covered by Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds on "Kicking Against the Pricks"):



Here is the bonus track (the one that has nothing to do with petty individual relationships, but with world politics), the Mekons' Ghost of American Astronauts, what a great song (w/ lyrics):



Up in the hills above Bradford
Outside the Napalm factory
(They're floating above us)
Ghosts of American Astronauts
Glow in the headlights beam

It's just a small step for him
It's a nice break from Vietnam
(Filmed in a factory)
Out on the back lot in Houston
Who says the world isn't flat

A flag flying free in a vacuum
Nixon sucks a dry Martini
Ghosts of American astronauts
Stay with us in our dreams

John Glenn drinks cocktails with God
In a cafe in downtown Saigon
(High above them)
Ghosts of American Astronauts
Are drifting too close to the sun

A flag flying free in a vacuum
Nixon sucks a dry Martini
Ghosts of American astronauts
Stay with us in our dreams


And, finally, one of the best renderings of "quarreling husband and wife" ever, "this house is a house of trouble":


Wednesday, October 26, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 112: SONG # 142

Day 142: Songs for a Foggy Austrian National Holiday

It is a tendency of mine to stay at home on foggy and rainy autumn days, and in case that this circumstance of wheather goes together with a holiday, there is also a good chance that I can do it. I do not know why, but today's outside climate and the according inside cozy feeling seem to be perfectly accompanied by some tracks from Swagger, maybe the best album by one of the most underrated bands in the world, Bristol's Blue Aeroplanes. I remember to have been at a great gig of this band at Vienna's Kennedy's Club some 20 years ago and I am relatively sure that the occasion of their touring has been to promote Swagger. They have a load of guitar players, a very cool and overtly pretentious frontman and a polish guy whose only job is dancing. They are a bunch of COOL guys, or however you would put that. I will begin with the song from Swagger that is most appropriate for toaday's wheather, Weightless:



Then there is my favourite song by this band, Jacket Hangs - I dug this version because I do not like the VEVO versions and the live version on UTUBE have rather poor quality, soundwise:



And, since they are a great big live band, one live version of a song from SWAGGER, "... and stones", live on WDR:

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 111: SONG # 141

Day 111: A Song You Listen to When You Are Happy



From the 60ies: Esther & Abi Ofarim, Sing Hallelujah:


Esther & Abi Ofarim - Sing Hallelujah von goldrausch

Monday, October 24, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 110 SONG # 140

Day 110: A Song You Listen to When You Are Angry

This here song is perfect when you are angry - it was written by Robert Zimmerman, allegedly with the folk-music-business in mind. I have my own "Maggies" and their relatives who used to hand me a nickle and a dime, asking whether I had a good time. I cannot listen to Dylan's version any more since I have grown accustomed to the rendition by RAGE AGAINSt THE MACHNINE. This version is pure energy:


Sunday, October 23, 2011

1000 SONGS - DAY 109: SONG # 139

Day 109: A Song from (One Of) Your Favourite Album(s)

Mauvaises nouvelles des étoiles by Serge Gainsbourg, his second Reggae-album (1981), featuring the I Threes on background vocals as well as Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare as rhythm section, is one of my favourite albums, and I guess, my favourite french album (maybe Melody Nelson by Serge Gainsbourg could be taken into consideration as a rival here). First song that comes to my mind from that album is ECCE HOMO, also the title of one of my favourite books (Nietzsche's brilliant work from 1888). Here it is, follwioed by the lyrics:


Et ouais c'est moi Gainsbarre
On me trouve au hasard
Des night-clubs et des bars
Américains c'est bonnard

On reconnaît Gainsbarre
A ses jeans à sa barbe
De trois nuits ses cigares
Et ses coups de cafard
(Et son œil au beur noir)*

Bizarre ce Gainsbarre
Il est cool faut croire
Que de tout il en arre
Rien à cirer enfin faut voir

Et ouais cloué le Gainsbarre
Au mont du Golgothar
Il est reggae hilare
Le cœur percé de part en part


There are biblical allusions here as well as in Nietzsche's book, since "Ecce Homo" is a quotation from John 19, 5. Gainsbourg goes on with his reading of the new testament, taking sides against the arian rendering of it, in another song from the same album, called Juif et Dieu



Et si Dieu était juif ça t'inquiéterait petite
Sais-tu que le Nazaréen
N'avait rien d'un Aryen
Et s'il est fils de Dieu comme vous dites
Alors

Dieu est Juif
Juif et Dieu

Le Capital tu as lu de l'Israélite
Karl Marx un beau bouquin
Et le trio bolchevik la troîka des purs eh bien
Tous trois de race sémite
Je te le prouverai tout à l'heure

Dieu est Juif
Juif et Dieu

Grigori Ievseîetch Apfelbaum dit Zionoviev
Lev Borissovitch Rosenfeld dit Kamenev
Lev Davidovitch Bronstein dit Trotsky

Dieu est Juif
Juif et Dieu

Voici le temps de l'antéchrist
La bombe à neutrons hein
Petite fille de papa Einstein
Encore un juif si tu vois ce que je veux dire petite

Dieu est Juif
Juif et Dieu

Finally, a song from the same album, one, that has nothing to do with religion: Shush Shush Shush Charlotte:




Serge Gainsbourg is most widely known for his duet "Je t'aime - moi non plus" with Jane Birkin.
What many people might not know, is that one of the songs he has written has won the Grand Prix D'Eurovision in 1965 interpreted by France Gall, who was the representative of Luxembourg then: Poupée de cire, poupée de son. He could have meant: "poupée de song", as well....: Here it is, as a bonus track:





Je suis une poupée de cire
Une poupée de son
Mon cœur est gravé dans mes chansons
Poupée de cire poupée de son

Suis-je meilleure suis-je pire
Qu'une poupée de salon
Je vois la vie en rose bonbon
Poupée de cire poupée de son

Mes disques sont un miroir
Dans lequel chacun peut me voir
Je suis partout à la fois
Brisée en mille éclats de voix

Autour de moi j'entends rire
Les poupées de chiffon
Celles qui dansent sur mes chansons
Poupée de cire poupée de son

Elles se laissent séduire
Pour un oui pour un nom
L'amour n'est pas que dans les chansons
Poupée de cire poupée de son

Mes disques ont un miroir
Dans lequel chacun peut me voir
Je suis partout à la fois
Brisée en mille éclats de voix

Seule parfois je soupire
Je me dis à quoi bon
Chanter ainsi l'amour sans raison
Sans rien connaître des garçons

Je n'suis qu'une poupée de cire
Qu'une poupée de son
Sous le soleil de mes cheveux blonds
Poupée de cire poupée de son

Mais un jour je vivrai mes chansons
Poupée de cire poupée de son
Sans craindre la chaleur des garçons
Poupée de cire poupée de son.